8 Smart Projects to Increase the Vaule of Your Home

Hello Everyone,

I wanted to share these great tips to consider when thinking about selling your home,

If you’re smart and dedicated, homeownership can be a lifelong, extremely valuable investment. And while repairs, updates and renovations can help to improve this investment, how do you know which ones will yield the biggest return? Remodeling Magazine recently released its annual Cost vs. Value Report, a useful resource that examines 36 of the most popular remodel projects across 102 U.S. markets, and compares how each stack up in terms of retained value. Based on this data, here are eight of the most valuable, yet practical home improvement projects you should consider investing in this year.

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1. Replace Your Front Door

Your front door is probably the most utilized and therefore, weathered part of your home. For a quick and relatively inexpensive improvement project, consider swapping out your wood door for a steel one, which will provide you with a 101.8% return on investment. At an average cost of $1,230, a steel door is sturdier and will last longer than a wood one, will require much fewer repairs, and can be customized according to your color and finish preferences. If steel is not your thing, you may also consider a fiberglass door, which while almost double the price, will provide you with many of the same benefits, and a 72% return on investment.

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2. Incorporate Stone Veneer Into Your Home’s Façade

Natural stone veneer siding is a beautiful way to enhance the look and feel of your home. With this alternative to traditional masonry work, you’ll get the same authentic beauty and color variation that you would with the more expensive marble or slate. At an average cost of $7,150, you’ll see a 92.2% return on investment by adding stone veneer siding to your home’s facade. While you’ll probably need to hire a pro, an added bonus with stone veneer is that it’s quick and relatively easy to install.

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3. Install a New Garage Door

With an average cost of $1,595, you’ll see an 88.4% return on investment with a new garage door. Depending on your style, you can choose from a wide range of materials that include steel, fiberglass, glass and wood. No matter your choice, a new garage door is the perfect and affordable way to immediately improve the curb appeal of your home.

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4. Install New Siding

Vinyl siding is one of the most practical updates you can make to your home. A relatively new innovation on the home-building front, vinyl siding installation averages $12,013 and sees an 80.7% return on investment. Not only can it withstand extreme hot or cold weather, it is virtually resistant to rot and decay. Vinyl siding comes in a wide range of colors, does not fade, and if insulated, can be extremely energy efficient.

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5. Build a Wooden Deck

Whether you are looking to enhance the front of your house with a wraparound style or your backyard with a freestanding variety, a new deck is well worth the investment. On average, decks cost $10,048 and provide an 80.5% return on investment, depending on style, and wood species. Remember that whatever material you choose for your deck, in order to preserve its color and longevity, you’ll want to make sure you actively apply a finish for extended protection.

6. Do a Kitchen Facelift

If you were to make any one improvement to your house, it should be to your kitchen. And while this may sound like a big and expensive endeavor, there are plenty of ways you can make meaningful updates without too much pain and suffering. At an average cost of $19,226 with a 79.3% return on investment, a kitchen “facelift” that includes one or two new appliances, refaced cabinetry, and new countertops, will make a world of a difference, without completely breaking the bank.

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7. Replace Your Windows

Whether it’s for function or aesthetic reasons, after years of use, your windows will need to be replaced. With an average cost of $11,341 and a 78.8% return on investment, you should consider upgrading to wood window frames. In addition to their visual appeal, including the ability to customize color and design, wood windows provide great insulation and are energy efficient. The one drawback to wood window frames is that they do require ongoing maintenance. At an average of $11,198 with a 72.9% return on investment, you could alternately consider vinyl window frames.

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Renew Your Roof

If you inspect your roof regularly, you will have a good sense of when it needs to be replaced. And although it may seem like a hefty expense with an average price of $19,528, you will see a 71.6% return on investment if you add a new roof to your list of projects this year. While there are a number of materials you can choose from for your new roof including wood, clay and metal, the best and most affordable bet is asphalt shingles.

Thank you for reading these great tips and remember to give us a call to speak to one f our agents today!

Sincerely,

Scott Myers, Century 21 Scott Myers Realtors

(210) 479-1222

Ready, Set, Move!!!!

c21
Hello,

It is that time of year again! The spring season is a great time to get moving and get ready to enjoy your new home.

Sometimes, moving can be quite stressful if you do not prepare and plan ahead. Just remember to always give yourself enough time and planning. I have a few tips to remember to make your move stress free.

First off,

As Soon as You Know a Moving Date
•If you’re hiring movers, get price estimates and a list of services. Place your order when you know you have a firm move date.

•If you’re moving yourself, check moving truck prices and reserve a truck.

4-6 Weeks Before Moving
•Keep packing if you’re doing the work yourself. If movers will pack you ask the moving company for advice on the best ways to prepare.

•Contact people who work for you on a regular basis, such as pool maintenance companies and gardeners, to cancel their services. Leave their business cards for new owners.

•Place reference manuals for major appliances in a kitchen cabinet or drawer where new owners will find them. Label extra keys and place in the drawer.

2 Weeks Before Moving
•Call utility companies and arrange for meter readings on the day of closing so that all services after that date are the responsibility of the new owner. The new owner should also notify utilities of the switchover and set up new accounts.

•Have utilities disconnected at closing if the new owner does not establish accounts.

•Stop auto delivery of propane gas or fuel unless it is really needed.

•Arrange to discontinue your telephone service on the day of closing. Give your cell phone number or another contact number to everyone associated with the move and real estate closing, just in case they need to reach you after the home phone has been disconnected.

•Arrange to disconnect your satellite or cable TV coverage.

•Now do just the opposite to begin establishing services at your new home.

•File a change of address notice at the post office, making it effective on your moving date or a few days before.

•Notify your creditors, magazine subscriptions, friends and family, doctors, dentists and others of your new address.

•Schedule a cancellation date or new address for newspaper deliveries.

•If you’re moving out of the area, start picking up items out for cleaning or repair. Return library books and rented DVDs and videos. Arrange to have your prescriptions transferred to a pharmacy near your new home.

•Start an essentials box or two–all the things you’ll need immediately after you unload at your new location, such as toiletries, a broom, towels, sheets, blankets, a change of clothes and nightware.

•Find certificates verifying that your pets are up-to-date on required vaccinations. Gather other important documents and plan to carry them with you on the day of moving.

•Open a bank account at your new location, or, if you’re staying in the area, order checks with your new address.

1 Week Before Moving
•Confirm that your closing is still on track and handle tasks required by your closing agent.

•Confirm moving and delivery dates with movers or check your truck reservation.

•Clean each room thoroughly as you finish packing. Don’t forget major appliances. Wait to pack your vacuum and other tools necessary for last-minute cleaning on moving day.

•Arrange to cancel existing homeowner’s insurance coveage after the closing is complete and you no longer own the property. If there’s a delay, call your insurance agent immediately.

•Arrange for someone to read the level of propane gas or fuel oil in tanks that remain on the property if your sales contract requires the new owners to pay you market price for the fuel.

On Moving Day
•Walk through every part of the house to find stray items, opening cabinet and closet doors.

•Make sure you have keys to your new home.

•Supervise movers as they load, then again at delivery to make sure boxes and other items go to the right rooms at your new home.

•Watch for damaged items or damaged boxes. Note all damage on the mover’s bill of lading and ask the supervising person to sign off on the notation.

•Unpack your essentials box–then try to relax for awhile before you start the big unpacking job.

If you’ve ever moved you know there’s more to it than this! Transporting pets, plants and people in a comfortable way should top your list, and nearly everything you cancel at your old home must be started again at the new location.

Please Remember these tips and your move should go smoothly.

Scott Myers, Century 21 Scott Myers, Realtors

Taking the Headache Out of Moving

Moving from one house to another is always a challenge, but it doesn’t have to be a nightmare. Here are some simple tips on how to get it done with minimal stress and strain.

 

  • Look at all the alternatives: hiring a moving company, for example, versus renting a truck and doing it yourself. Whichever alternative makes most sense for you, get bids from more than one vendor.

 

  • A few days before the moving company is scheduled to arrive or you’re supposed to pick up your rental truck, call to confirm that everything is on track to happen when it’s supposed to.

 

  • Prepare your change of address notices in advance and send them out as soon as it’s appropriate to do so. The Post Office, utilities, people and companies you do business with, magazine subscriptions, friends, relatives – all should be notified of your move. Most, if not all, can be done on-line, but the Post Office will still furnish change of address cards if you prefer to do it that way.

 

  • Get an early start on packing by concentrating on seldom-used items first. Each box should have its contents and the room those contents belong in written on it clearly.

 

  • Take a hard look at things you seldom or never use and throw away as many of them as you can. The more you throw away, the less you’ll have to move – and every item you throw away is one less item to clutter up you new home.

 

  • Use your extra towels and linens to protect breakables, and when your supply of these things is exhausted, crumpled newspaper makes an excellent substitute. Write “Fragile” on all appropriate boxes.

 

  • Put your valuables (such as jewelry) and important documents (birth certificates, insurance policies, car titles, etc.) aside in some safe place where they won’t be misplaced, especially if you plan to take them with you and don’t want them packed with your household items.

 

  • When the house is empty, go back for a thorough final inspection. Check closets, crawl spaces, basement, garage, attic, out-of-the-way nooks and crannies of all kinds. Have a second person make the same inspection separately.

 

  • Clean your new home thoroughly before moving in. It’s infinitely easier that way.

 

  • Decide in advance where you want the heavy furniture. Changing your mind after the movers have departed is no fun – especially for your back!

 

  • Locate all fuses, circuit breakers, and water/gas valves in your new house. Record meter readings and check smoke detectors.

 

  • Make a list of phone numbers for the local police and fire stations, doctors, nearby hospitals, etc. Put a copy of your list near each phone. If you’re not sure how to find the important contact numbers in your new area, ask your REALTOR® – he/she should have a list already prepared for you.

 

 

Above all, plan, plan, plan and plan some more. Make a schedule you can live with, and then stick to it. Preparation and forethought will help you to keep everything under control and finish the move with your sanity and your nerves intact.

 

The above is not all-inclusive, but should be a good starting point. Your REALTOR® has likely helped many clients with their moves, and should be able to add to this list and answer questions specific to your situation.

 

 

Scott Myers

Broker/Owner of Century 21 Scott Myers

(210) 479-1222 or Toll-Free (888) 868-1222

email: Scott.Myers@Century21.com