Homebuyers Mistakes to Avoid

Hello Everyone,

Buying a home can be both exciting and overwhelming for the first-time homebuyer. If you’ve decided to take the plunge into home ownership and have already started the search process, make sure you’re not making some common first-time homebuyer mistakes.

Your upcoming investment could end up being a bad decision if you overlook some important facts about home ownership and sign that contract before you’re really ready.

Here are five mistakes first time homebuyers need to avoid:

1. Searching for the dream home before getting prequalified for a loan. Save yourself the disappointment of not being able to afford the home of your dreams by getting prequalified for your loan before you start house hunting. Instead of picking out a price range and searching listings, take the time to talk to a lender about how much house you can realistically afford and what the monthly payment breakdown – with all taxes and other fees included – will be. The amount you are preapproved for will help you create a realistic budget for your home search.

2. Delaying the buying process in hopes of a better rate. Mike Schenk, vice president of economics and statistics at the Credit Union National Association, points out that adjustable rates are now at rock bottom at about 3 percent. If you really are ready to make the commitment for home ownership, talk to a lender about securing a loan at an adjustable rate instead of a fixed rate.

3. Thinking short term. It’s easy to get carried away with that new home search and overlook some important information about the neighborhood you would move to, future developments in the area and the resale value of your home. As a first-time homebuyer, the idea of selling your home in the near future probably isn’t at the top of the priority list, but it should be. “Buy that first house with the idea that you can resell it with some ease should your plans change in five years,” says Mike Bacsi, senior mortgage loan officer and assistant vice president at Johnson Bank. “Hold off on buying the super charming or quirky house until you are financially established and can afford the charm.”

You also need to think about the long-term effects of your decision to buy that home. If the neighborhood is undergoing any type of redevelopment phase, the value of your home could increase in the near future. If you end up buying an older home in hopes it will appreciate in value, keep in mind that your investment could be a risky one.

4. Making an emotional decision. While the right home for you is a matter of personal preference and affordability, you need to separate your emotions from the decision before signing the contract. Turning a blind eye on that moldy basement or creaky floorboards because you’re enamored with the architectural style of the house can lead to financial troubles in the future. You want to make sure you’re investing in a home that will offer you a good return on your investment and ideally has a good resale value.

Take the time to run the numbers, create a pro and con list of each property and use an objective approach for your homebuying decision. Remember that even realtors and homeowners selling a home on their own will be pitching their property to prospective buyers using all types of marketing strategies. Keep an open mind, but also do your homework to make sure you’re investing in a home that you can be happy with for years to come.

5. Overlooking hidden costs. In addition to that monthly mortgage payment, you need to consider the cost of home maintenance, utilities and property taxes. If you are buying an older home, you may end up needing money to cover the cost of repairs and renovations. While the selling price can give you a fair idea of what you will be investing for your home, you also need to look at all of the extra costs required to maintain your home and cover property taxes.

Your lender or realtor may not necessarily be the best source for this type of information, so start researching costs on your own. Turn to a home inspector for a list of existing or potential problems that may need to be taken care of in the near future. Consider getting quotes from renovation specialists or builders in the area to price out potential updates and home improvement projects. Also, don’t overlook moving costs and extra furniture you might have to purchase to furnish a larger living space.

Please give us a call to schedule an appointment with one of our Agents today!

Sincerely,

Scott Myers, Century 21 Scott Myers Realtors

(210) 479-1222

Advertisements

Five Crucial Home Selling Decisions if You Want to Sell in 2015

Hello,

If you’re planning on selling your home in 2015 there are five crucial decisions that can help you maximize your sale price, get your home sold quickly and do it all without the mountain of stress that often comes with the sale of your home.

Decision #1 – Decide to prepare sooner than later. Home sellers who wait until spring to get their home “ready” are already behind the curve. The real estate year is in full swing by March 1st and homes that sell quickly and for top dollar during the “selling season” are the homes where the owner had a plan, got their home ready, staged, and listed early in the year.

Decision #2 – Decide to prepare yourself emotionally. Selling your home can be very emotional. When you receive an offer for less than you think your home is worth, it generates a whole host of negative emotions. You can feel angry, frustrated, and think everyone is trying to steal your home from you.

Well, they’re not. Buyers just want to know they’re getting the best price. We all feel similar when we make a big purchase. So be careful to manage your emotions. And if you get a “low-ball” offer rely on the help of a trusted professional. A good agent can often gently negotiate the price into a range where everyone wins. The key is to keep your emotional swings in check.

Decision #3 – Be realistic and price your home accordingly. One of the big keys to getting your home sold quickly, for the most money, is pricing it correctly. If you price your home too high, thinking you’ll “test the market,” it can be costly. Your home can sit on the market too long and get labeled as a “no-need-to-show” because you’re viewed as being unrealistic.

You see it all the time. Sellers think they are going to “hold out” and get a better price. Well, you need to consider how soon you want to sell? The reality is you can get just about any price you want if you’re willing to wait long enough. If you wait 5-7 years your home will very likely sell for a more than it will today. But if you want to sell in 90-120 days for top dollar, pricing is a crucial issue that you should discuss at length with a trusted real estate professional.

Decision #4 – Reconcile reality quickly. This is somewhat similar to decision #2, but it’s actually more practical and actionable. Emotions can be hard to define and control, like in point #2. But what is fairly easy to judge is your market’s numbers, and the realities of value.

Agents always hear things like, “But my home has this, this and this. Therefor it should be worth a lot more.” In theory that’s somewhat true. However, the reality you have to be prepared to reconcile is, if people won’t pay more for those things, it doesn’t make your home worth more.

Now don’t get me wrong. I’m not trying to soften you up so you give your home away. The goal is to help you get the highest possible price, in the shortest time, with the fewest hassles. But something that’s very important to deal with is reality, not wishful thinking. Wishful thinking backs tens of thousands of home sellers into very difficult positions every year.

Having a clear objective view of reality, as well as a trusted professional to help guide you through the emotional ups and downs, can help you avoid a massive mountain of emotional stress, while your home just sits on the market.

My encouragement is, prepare yourself for the true realities, while maintaining high standards throughout the process. It’s a balancing act that with the help of a trusted professional can be far easier to navigate.

Decision #5 – Trust your gut. When interviewing agents there are few things more important than a deep level of trust between you and the agent you choose to represent you. And trust comes in two crucial parts. The first is professional competency.

To trust someone with what is likely the single biggest financial transaction of your life, you need to have confidence that the agent you choose has the skills, technology and ability to fight hard and win what’s in your best interests. That’s why choosing someone just because they’re a “friend of the family” isn’t always the best choice.

The second layer of trust is personal. When you work with someone on something as important as the sale of your home, you need to know you can trust that person personally.

You need to feel a deep sense of confidence that your agent puts your needs in front of their own. It’s not about flash and glitter, or how many homes that agent sold. What’s important is, “Can I trust this person with my financial future?”

That’s where “listen to your gut” comes in. most of us can sense authenticity and integrity. It comes out in many ways and generally when you’re in the presence of it you know in your gut. Sometimes the person might be a little quirky, other times they’re not, but again it’s not about flash and charisma.

The bottom line, choose someone you trust on both a professional and personal level and “go with your gut.”

I hope you found these suggestions helpful. Selling your home is a life altering series of decisions. The better prepared you are to make those decisions effectively, the better the end result.

And as always, if there is anything at all I can do to help you, please feel free to call us at 210-479-1222, or toll free, 888-868-1222. The conversation is always free and you’re under no obligation of any kind. Our entire objective in our conversation is always to help you in any way that I can.

  Cordially,

Scott Myers, GRI
Broker-Owner
Century 21 Scott Myers, Realtors
11830 Wurzbach Rd. (The Elms)
San Antonio, Tx. 78230
Phone # 210-479-1222
Fax # 210-479-1981
Toll free Phone # 1-888-868-1222 Scott.Myers@Century21.com
Find us: Web Site | Facebook | Twitter | ReachFactor | Google +
Check out our Blog: Living in San Antonio http://www.century21.com/pressRelease.c21?id=169